Hacking

Americans keep looking away from the election’s most alarming story

Americans keep looking away from the election’s most alarming story:

Part of the Russian operation’s success is that we cannot measure the effect. Did the DNC emails depress the Sanders vote for Clinton? Did the Podesta emails turn off independents? Would voters have responded differently if major media had reported the email releases not as legitimate news but as an intelligence operation by a hostile foreign power aimed at undermining the integrity of U.S. elections? There are no clear answers. But there are certainties: The email operation increased negative stories about Clinton, fueled an immense propaganda attack and diminished coverage of actual issues. The large polling lead Clinton gained after the debates slipped significantly under this barrage of negativity — even before FBI Director James B. Comey’s bombshell.

Chinese appliances are shipping with malware-distributing WiFi chips

Chinese appliances are shipping with malware-distributing WiFi chips:

So what are these sneaky Chinese appliances up to? Right now, it looks like they’re only looking for unsuspecting drones to add to someone’s spam-serving army. Once a machine has been compromised, though, it’s possible that those in control would push additional malware to a victim’s machine.

Amazing. 

Criminals constructing ATM skimmers from DAPs --

A recent article from Brian Krebs highlights a new trend in ATM skimmers: by using parts from cut-rate audio players and spy cams, criminals are able to construct something called an audio skimmer that records the data from the magnetic strip for later playback

From Criminals constructing ATM skimmers from DAPs — Engadget

As William Gibson mentioned in the 1980s: technology, no matter how advanced, almost immediately falls to the level of the street. The street finds its own uses for things.

The Great Cyberheist

Gonzalez was tired of working for the Secret Service. "He wasn't showing up on time," according to Agent Michael, who began talking with other agents about cutting Gonzalez loose. "He didn't want to be there." He was also tired of war driving. He wanted a new challenge. He found one in a promising technique called SQL injection.

From The Great Cyberheist - NYTimes.com

Great article on how black hats operate. In this case, they were really talented script kiddies with great professionalism and discipline.