Isis

Predatory Islamic State Wrings Money From Those It Rules

Predatory Islamic State Wrings Money From Those It Rules:

Across wide expanses of Syria and Iraq, the Islamic State, with the goal of building a credible government, has set up a predatory and violent bureaucracy that wrings every last American dollar, Iraqi dinar and Syrian pound it can from those who live under its control or pass through its territory. Interviews with more than a dozen people living inside or recently escaped from the Islamic State-controlled territory, and Western and Middle Eastern officials who track the militants’ finances, describe the group as exacting tolls and traffic tickets; rent for government buildings; utility bills for water and electricity; taxes on income, crops and cattle; and fines for smoking or wearing the wrong clothes.

Extraction economy.

the group may spend hundreds of hours trying to enlist a single individual, to learn how their...

“the group may spend hundreds of hours trying to enlist a single individual, to learn how their personal problems and grievances fit into a universal theme of persecution against all Muslims.”

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Mindless terrorists? The truth about Isis is much worse | Scott Atran | Comment is free | The Guardian

ISIS is yet another in a long line of single villain ideologies.

Inside an undercover network trying to expose Islamic State’s atrocities

Inside an undercover network trying to expose Islamic State’s atrocities:

“We are nonviolent activists. We can’t fight Daesh with weapons. We can only fight them with words,” he said, using an Arabic acronym for the Islamic State. “To defeat us, they would have to shut down the Internet. And they can’t do that because all of them use the Internet.”

What does a ISIS held city look like? North Korea in the making.

What’s so new about the Islamic State’s governance?

What’s so new about the Islamic State’s governance?:

of the insurgencies that provided education and health care, nearly 72 percent of insurgencies provided education to civilians, and just over 71 percent of rebel movements provided health care. In other words, if an insurgent group provides social services, they are more likely to offer these services to civilians. Once an insurgency acquired territory, nearly 49 percent would ensure that the civilian population received education or medical care, consistent with recent research on rebel governance.

ISIS thinks education and health care are roles of government.