The New Republic

How Conservatives Are Hoodwinking Big Tech


In April, Facebook announced that it would participate in an audit led by the Heritage Foundation—not exactly a neutral arbiter—that would examine accusations of bias. And on Wednesday, The Washington Post reported that executives from both Facebook and Twitter were “scrambling to assuage conservative leaders who have sounded alarms—and sought to rile voters—with accusations that the country’s tech giants are censoring right-leaning posts, tweets, and news.”
via How Conservatives Are Hoodwinking Big Tech
There is no bias. They are attempting to work the refs with false accusations of bias. This is the conservative movement playing the victim card.

Why You Can't Have 'Family Values' Without Valuing Fathers

Why You Can't Have "Family Values" Without Valuing Fathers:

When my wife was pregnant and I realized I would need to be home, I discovered that Time Warner had this strange policy under which anyone could get ten paid weeks, unless you were a man who impregnated the mother of a child. I went, in private, straight to [the Time Warner] benefits [department] and said, “I’m sure this is an oversight and you didn’t mean to exclude dads.” They wouldn’t give me an answer for months. Then my daughter was born in an emergency delivery, and eleven days later I’m home holding my four-pound preemie, messaging benefits, saying “Hey, I need an answer.” That’s when they wrote back to say that they would be unable to give me paid leave benefits. I decided to file a suit with the EEOC for gender discrimination.

Paid leave is not a law requiring businesses to pay you when you’re out. Paid family leave is an insurance system that would tax 20 cents for every $100 you make. Studies show that when people find out what paid leave is, they support it.

We're Checking the Wrong Privilege

We're Checking the Wrong "Privilege":

Cultural capital—what “privilege” often, but not always, refers to these days—is a seductive concept. It tells us that the rich stay rich through the discreet perpetuation of cultural preferences. Privilege isn’t just money or luxury goods; it’s also about the foods you eat, the shows you watch. When you first learn about it, likely in Sociology 101, cultural capital can seem like a way to explain everything. The problem, however, is that landlords, health providers, and universities don’t accept cultural capital in lieu of monetary payment.

Privilege is a bad argument. Whenever I’ve asked how “checking privilege” somehow leads to individual or collective action that affects positive change, the answer is always hand waving and platitudes.